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  1. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 28, 2014

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    Been looking at these a lot lately- late 1940s/ early 1950s Heuer Triple Date with movement. See the spring at the base of the rotating weight? The springs stop the weight rotating fully and so these movements are known as "bumper movements"
    vintage_heuer_stainless_steel_triple_date_1940__s_automatic_bumper_movement_4_lgw.jpg vintage_heuer_stainless_steel_triple_date_1940__s_automatic_bumper_movement_1_lgw.jpg

    A. Schild was a movement maker that focused on inexpensive 3-hand watch movements- they ignored the chronograph market. They were swallowed up by ETA in the late 1970s.
     
  2. dsio

    dsio Ash @ ΩF Staff Member Dec 28, 2014

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    Had no idea Heuer made bumpers, especially uncommon to see on a triple date, Omega made a lot of bumpers in the 40s and 50s but their triple dates were still manual wind, that Heuer would have been quite an achievement in its era.
     
  3. Calibre11

    Calibre11 Editor of Calibre11.com Staff Member Dec 28, 2014

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    I guess that Omega was encouraged/ forced to use family movements (ETA, Valjoux) rather than those from outside the group (A. Schild)?